Garden and Table

This blog is devoted to plants, their uses, cultivation, and the occasional recipe! Organic Gardener! Zone 7a. If you have any questions, ask away!

thehungrybog:

Drosera angelica (by Ian Keith)

thehungrybog:

Drosera angelica (by Ian Keith)

Posted September 29th, 2014 with 57 notes .

rhamphotheca:

Meet China’s baby-shaped pears and heart-shaped melons
Baby-shaped pears, heart-shaped watermelons and square apples are hitting supermarkets in China and Japan. But are these fruits just frivolous fun?
by Bec Crew
Since the beginnings of agriculture, humans have been customising their fruits and vegetables to suit their needs. Early on, bigger fruits and higher yields were the most important considerations, and while these factors still outweigh the actual taste factor, other, slightly less pressing desires have come into play over the past decade or so.
Namely, people want to eat fruit that doesn’t look like regular fruit.
Which is how baby-shaped pears have come into existence. Grown by China-based manufacturing company, Fruit Mould Co., these strange little shapes have been selling like crazy in China, along with square-shaped apples, and heart-shaped watermelons and cucumbers. Their Buddha-shaped pears are apparently extremely popular…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia & NZ)
photos: Fruit Mould Co.

rhamphotheca:

Meet China’s baby-shaped pears and heart-shaped melons

Baby-shaped pears, heart-shaped watermelons and square apples are hitting supermarkets in China and Japan. But are these fruits just frivolous fun?

by Bec Crew

Since the beginnings of agriculture, humans have been customising their fruits and vegetables to suit their needs. Early on, bigger fruits and higher yields were the most important considerations, and while these factors still outweigh the actual taste factor, other, slightly less pressing desires have come into play over the past decade or so.

Namely, people want to eat fruit that doesn’t look like regular fruit.

Which is how baby-shaped pears have come into existence. Grown by China-based manufacturing company, Fruit Mould Co., these strange little shapes have been selling like crazy in China, along with square-shaped apples, and heart-shaped watermelons and cucumbers. Their Buddha-shaped pears are apparently extremely popular

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia & NZ)

photos: Fruit Mould Co.

(via thehopefulbotanymajor)

Posted September 29th, 2014 with 1,384 notes .

biodiverseed:

nubbsgalore:

as summer turns to autumn, decreasing levels of light begin to slow the production of chlorophyll in leaves, causing their green colour to fade. the production of carotenoids and flavonoids also begins to slow, but these pigments are broken down more slowly than chlorophyll, allowing their yellow and orange colours to be expressed. for some leaves, this time of year also sees an increase in the production of the flavonoid anthocyanin, causing those leaves with lower levels of other flavonoids or carotenoids to turn red.  (see also: autumnal art)

photos by (click pic) heiko gerlicherlevi basist, matt cardypatrick pleul, kacper kowalskidina rudickalexander kunzagustin rafael reyes and yann arthus bertrand

#chemistry

Posted September 27th, 2014 with 6,386 notes.

biodiverseed:

Bee garden starter kit

I have hundreds of fresh-harvested seeds from my bee gardens this year, and not enough space to use them, so I will try and turn this surplus into a something to help this project grow and flourish.

For a $15 donation to the biodiverseed project, I will send you a bee garden starter kit. With the exception of gladiolus, which should be lifted and stored indoors every year, these plants will all survive or re-seed in zones 5 and higher. The kit will be complete with sowing instructions. Many of these should be sown in Fall.

  • Giant Alliums (“Globemaster” and “Millenium”) in purple and white - pictured
  • Wild Danish Lupines (purple and pink) - pictured
  • Bearded iris (old inherited variety, cultivar unknown) - pictured
  • Digitalis (pink and white) - pictured
  • Gladiolus (pink) - pictured // if not available, will be swapped with Hollyhock
  • Borage (ranges from white to pink to purple to blue) - pictured
  • Fritillaria imperialis (orange and yellow) - pictured
  • Danish Wild Rose (pink and white) - not pictured

I will also include a selection of annual flowers and herbs, depending on availability: calendula, marigolds, lavatera, sunflowers, nigella and mints are what I have most of right now.

I grow these plants for many purposes: many are edible (alliums, borage, nigella, calendula, mint), or nitrogen fixers (lupines), or pest-repellant (marigolds) in addition to being beneficial to pollinators.

Email me at biodiverseed@gmail.com to order. I can combine an order with any of the other offers for free seeds from my garden right now.

Related: Integrating flowers into your vegetable garden

*I usually can’t ship to California, Hawai’i, or Australia. Please make sure that these species are not invasive in your area: I will also check before I ship. The seeds are shipped from Denmark. Please note this is not a “sale,” but rather a gift, for a donation.

(via botanicalendeavors)

Posted September 26th, 2014 with 148 notes.

floralls:

(by Sarah Ryhanen)

Oh, how I love Iris.

(via botanicalendeavors)

Posted September 26th, 2014 with 30,295 notes.

wire-man:

libutron:

A story of ants, bees and orchids: the Bucket Orchids

The genus Coryanthes (Asparagales - Orchidaceae) has one of the most complex flowers structures of the highly diverse orchid family. Sepals and tepals are usually turned back and soon wither after anthesis (the period during which a flower is fully open and functional).

The fleshy lip of the Coryanthes flower is composed of three parts: the cup shaped hypochil (the lower part of the lip), the partially covered, tubular mesochil (the intermediate or middle part of the lip), and the bucket-like enlarged epichil (the terminal part of the lip), which is filled up to the “exit” with a fluid, secreted by two broadly-falcate protuberances, called pleuridia, at the base of the column.

Coryanthes species grow on trees, and exclusively in ant nests of the genera Azteca, Campanotus, and Crematogaster, in so-called “ant-gardens”. These arboreal communities can reach diameters of 150 cm with the ant nest comprising 80 cm. Both organisms share a destiny because the plant is condemned to death if the associated ant colony dies. The plants offer nectar in extrafloral nectaries and provide a framework for nest construction with their root system, while the ants defend the plants against herbivores and additionally fertilize them with vertebrate feces. This abundant provision of nutrients by the ants allows the plants to grow rapidly.

All Coryanthes species are pollinated by males bees of the genera Euglossa, Eulaema, and Euplusia. The bees are attracted by the odor of the flowers and swarm around them. They land on the hypochil of the flower and try to  get below the hood to seek the fragrance compound. In trying to obtain a footing on the waxy, smooth mesochil they loose their footing and fall in the bucket-like epic hill which is filled with a mucilaginous fluid, where their wings are moistened. The only way to escape is crawling out through a tunnel, formed by the epichil of the lip and the column. The pollinator touches first the stigma and afterwards the sticky viscidium, which glues the whole pollen mass (pollinium) on him. After a second “error”, the flower is pollinated.

These photos show the species Coryanthes speciosa and the Orchid Bees, Euglossa tridentata (Apidae - Euglossini) on Coryanthes speciosa. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Eerika Schulz | Locality: Royal Gardens, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany, 2013] - [Bottom: ©Ian Morton | Locality: Hickatee Cottages, Punta Gorda, Toledo District, Belize, 2002]

These are the weirdest orchids, and they’re pretty sizeable.

(via botanicalendeavors)

Posted September 26th, 2014 with 316 notes.

thatsnotsoonenough:

What the hell kind of slower is this?

Ganzania.

thatsnotsoonenough:

What the hell kind of slower is this?

Ganzania.

Posted September 26th, 2014 with 16 notes .

greenlook-garden:

First signs of “pups” in the Sempervivum and the Aloe

Primeros “hijitos” de la Siempreviva y el Aloe

Posted September 26th, 2014 with 54 notes.

Posted September 25th, 2014 with 2,894 notes.

peonyandbee:

Today’s garden haul.
The tomatoes are teeny, but still tasty.  I just picked what looks like my last zucchini and yellow squash.  And the peppers…my god the peppers this year!  I’ve always struggled with peppers in past summers, but this year was a winner.  I’ve already made a note in my garden journal to plant about a third fewer poblano, jalapeno and thai chili plants.  They’re amazing, but we have so many I just don’t know what to do with them anymore.  The only thing I did differently this year was add a scoop of compost and a scoop of epsom salts in the hole before planting.  I added a small dose of each at the base of the plant once it started to flower several weeks later.  That’s it.  I guess they liked it!
I’m going to begin yanking the spent plants over the next few days, retiring the pots to the shed, and deadheading and fertilizing my perennials.  Everything looks ready to quit.  We’re going to be removing the legs from the table beds and rearranging the placement before putting everything to sleep for the winter.  
My garden performed wonderfully this spring and summer and I’m thankful.

Oh my! What a beautiful haul!

peonyandbee:

Today’s garden haul.

The tomatoes are teeny, but still tasty.  I just picked what looks like my last zucchini and yellow squash.  And the peppers…my god the peppers this year!  I’ve always struggled with peppers in past summers, but this year was a winner.  I’ve already made a note in my garden journal to plant about a third fewer poblano, jalapeno and thai chili plants.  They’re amazing, but we have so many I just don’t know what to do with them anymore.  The only thing I did differently this year was add a scoop of compost and a scoop of epsom salts in the hole before planting.  I added a small dose of each at the base of the plant once it started to flower several weeks later.  That’s it.  I guess they liked it!

I’m going to begin yanking the spent plants over the next few days, retiring the pots to the shed, and deadheading and fertilizing my perennials.  Everything looks ready to quit.  We’re going to be removing the legs from the table beds and rearranging the placement before putting everything to sleep for the winter.  

My garden performed wonderfully this spring and summer and I’m thankful.

Oh my! What a beautiful haul!

Posted September 25th, 2014 with 29 notes .

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